Five ways to outsmart your interviewer

Job Seekers
Shot of two people, one of them an interviewer, shaking hands during a meeting at work in a modern and well-lit office.


When you interview for a role that you really want, you simply can’t afford to bring anything less than your A-Game to the meeting. I’m sure that you will have read the job description carefully, picked your lucky outfit, and prepared your answers to their prospective questions. For some, that may be enough. But just in case, keep these tricks up your sleeve and you’ll be able to successfully convince the interviewer that you’re the right man or woman for the job!

1. They want to bring on board someone that they like… so be nice

This is a really easy one and while it might seem simple, it works! Maintain positive body language throughout, keep smiling and ask questions where relevant. We also recommend telling little personal anecdotes to give them a window into your personality.

2. Do your research

People like to talk about themselves and the things that interest them, so you’re more likely to endear yourself to interviewers if you ask about topics they want to talk about. Have a look for your interviewers on social media. LinkedIn and Twitter are the best channels for a good snoop into their history and areas of interest. It’s ok if they know you’ve done your research on them: you could even make a bit of a joke of it.

3. Ask probing questions

We think that the best interviews are two-way conversations – don’t wait until the end of the meeting to ask questions. It’s more interesting for both parties if you answer one of their questions by rounding it off with a query back to them. Similarly, at the beginning and end of the interview you might find yourself in a position to make small talk. Feel comfortable asking about their weekends, about the office space or how they get into work.

4. Show confidence with body language

Your body language tells its own story to the interviewer, regardless of the words coming out of your mouth. From the very first moment that you enter their line of sight, try and maintain strong body language. It will speak volumes about your confidence and sets you up to impress. Stay standing while you wait to greet your interviewer; maintain strong eye contact throughout the meeting; and refrain from fidgeting your feet and hands. Some of our Candidates find that a power pose before an interview can really help as well. If you arrive early enough, take five minutes to do this in the bathroom ahead of the meeting. Stand, with your feet shoulder width apart and your hands on your hips. Look straight ahead and hold the stance for at least two minutes while breathing deeply. You’ll be amazed at the confidence kick it gives you.

5. Be totally engaged

In an interview scenario it’s not uncommon to focus on what you’ve just said or what you’re about to say. Many Candidates struggle to simply be present in the conversation. It’s a big mistake not to engage completely with your interviewer. When they speak, focus on what they’re saying and respond accordingly. If they tell a joke, laugh. If they’re speaking on a more serious note, respond accordingly. This will leave them feeling like you’re truly enthused about the job at hand.

If you think you need a bit of extra help with your interview technique, why not try an online training course? You can also apply for available roles here.

 

 

David Morel Author David Morel Tiger Recruitment Team

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